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Discover Paris with Checkin Accommodation

Paris has a way of romancing visitors with its elegant beauty and magical ambience. This incomparable city is filled with grandiose monuments. Yet the charm of Paris lies in the small details: the quaint cobblestone streets, prettily trimmed trees, perfectly puffed pastries, dainty tea salons, Belle Epoque brasseries, and avant-garde art galleries. Like a veritable open-air museum, the city's buildings are works of art, and the Parisians' everyday fashion is worthy of a magazine spread.

  1. Eiffel Tower - Completed in 1889 for Paris' world exhibition, the tour is 320m (1050 feet) tall. Arguably the most famous iron beauty in the world,and the most visited paid monument, it is recommended visiting at night when the tower is magically illuminated.Parc du Champ de Mars, down the tour, has lawns and flowerbeds manicured with military precision (as you’d expect from a former army marching ground). Bring a blanket, wine and the best brie you can find to enjoy the greenery and wait for the light show at dusk to set La Tour Eiffel a-twinkle.
  2. Arc De Triomphe - The Arc de Triomphe (which is the biggest arch in the world) sits at the top of the Champs-Élysées (famous and largest avenue in the world) and celebrates Napoleon’s military victories. Walking up to the top offers great panoramic views of the city.
  3. Champs-Elysées - This grand boulevard is often called the world’s most beautiful avenue and it runs between Place de la Concorde and Arc de Triomphe. It’s mainly a place for tourists to walk along its large sidewalks and shop in the high-end retail establishments — but it’s something you do at least once while you visit Paris.
  4. Basilique Du Sacré-Cœur - is a majestic Romanesque-Byzantine white church that stands like a whipped-cream on top of a hill overlooking the city. Not only is the inside stunning, the view of the city from the dome is breathtaking.The whipped-cream appearance is mainly due to its stone known as ‘Château-Landon’. In wet weather, the calcite contained in the stone acts like a bleacher to give the church a definite chalky white look.While visiting the Sacré-Coeur, it's worth spending time exploring Montmartre. Once a little medieval village in the country, Montmartre has an old-fashioned charm with an avant-garde edge. During the Belle Epoque, the village of Montmartre began to attract famous artists such as Toulouse Lautrec and Edgar Degas. The Bohemian spirit of Montmartre is still found in its charming squares and cobblestone streets, especially around the Place du Tertre and the Carré Roland Dorgelès. There are also many excellent art museums including the Musée du Montmartre and the Espace Dali.
  5. The cathedral of Notre-Dame-de-Paris is a jewel of Gothic architecture and arguably one of the finest churches in Europe. Built from the Middle-Ages, the sanctuary is considered as a leading example of French Gothic architecture for its monumental dimensions, its fine stained-glass windows, its audacious flying buttresses and rich sculptures and statues.
  6. The Louvre —it’s only the most famous and one of the most massive museums (652,300 square feet) in the world. You can easily spend a few days there. It contains over 350,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century and you have to take a stroll through the adjacent Tuileries Gardens.
  7. Musée D’Orsay - Located in a grand old train station, the Orsay is devoted to all the arts between 1848-1914. It’s main focus is on Realism, Impressionism, Symbolism, and Art nouveau. Basically, it’s the best place to see Cézanne, Daumier, Degas, Gallé, Gauguin, Manet, Millet, Monet, Pissarro, Renoir, Rodin, Seurat, Sisley, and van Gogh — to name a few.
  8. Château de Versailles - Opulent is too weak of a word to describe the Château of Versailles, home of the kings of France from 1661 (Louis XIV) to 1789 (Louis XVI). You can easily spend all day walking the halls and exploring the vast gardens, the Hall of Mirrors, King's Grand Apartments, Museum of the History of France, the Grand Trianon and Marie-Antoinette’s country village (which she had constructed so she could pretend to live a simple country life.)
  9. Sainte-Chapelle - St. Chapelle is an impressive, yet relatively small Gothic cathedral that has the most beautiful and impressive stain-glass windows in Paris — and possibly in the world.
  10. Cimetière Du Père Lachaise - The most beautiful and largest cemetery in Paris. This is an amazing place to spend a few peaceful hours wandering among the more than 70,000 tombs. Père Lachaise is the final resting place for many rich Parisians and famous (including Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison, Chopin, Édith Piaf, Proust, Gertrude Stein, and many more) so you’ll find some beautiful tombs.
  11. Opéra Garnier - The Opera Garnier is an architectural masterpiece from the belle époque. Every square inch of the theatre is ornately designed.
  12. Jardin Du Luxembourg - Located between Saint-Germain-des-Prés and the Latin Quarter, the 57 acre Luxembourg Garden is the perfect place to find relaxation from the craziness of the city. The garden was built in the early 1600s and contains 106 statues, large fountains, a chateau, lots of trees, tennis courts, gorgeous flowers and plenty of relaxing Parisians.
  13. Jardin Des Tuileries – is the long and perfectly manicured park/garden adjacent to the Louvre. King Louis XIV turned the land into a traditional French garden in 1664 and now you’ll find multiple large fountains, decorative shrubs, flowers, and statues throughout the garden.
  14. The Canal Saint Martin was once a canal built by Napoleon to bring supplies from the north of Paris down to the Seine river. Now it’s a waterway that cuts through (and under) some of Paris’ most hip neighborhoods. But the best time to experience the canal is at night during the summer — because hundreds of people come to the canal with beer, wine, and food and hang out with friends.
  15. Catacombs - There is a network of over 200 miles of caves, tunnels and quarries under the streets of Paris. One section of these underground tunnels houses the bones of more than six million people — which has been neatly stacked and arranged. Now it’s a fairly popular/bizarre tourist attraction.
  16. Montparnasse Tower - is the only skyscraper within the city limits of Paris. It’s universally hated as being an eyesore. However, the views from the top are amazing. The best views of the city and it has the best views of the Eiffel Tower.
  17. Moulin Rouge - The Moulin Rouge is a cabaret known as the spiritual birthplace of the famous French Cancan. Located at the foot of Montmartre hill in the heart of Pigalle, it was built in 1889 by Joseph Oller and Charles Zidler. Initially introduced as a courtship dance, the cancan made possible the birth of the cabaret, now present in many countries around the world.
  18. La Promenade Plantée - A railroad track with a floral makeover, this elevated walkway offers superb views and allows you to sidle through lush green archways high above the city crowds. This charming 4.5km pathway runs through most of the 12th arrondissement.
  19. Parc de la Villette free open air cinema - Make the most of a summer evening in Paris and catch a free film at the open-air cinema at the Parc de la Villette. The programme runs during July and August and usually follows a particular theme
  20. Fashion show at Galeries Lafayette - Getting a seat for Paris Fashion Week might be beyond the means of most visitors, but it's possible to get a taste of la mode every Friday afternoon at the Galeries Lafayette department store. The free shows involve professional models strutting the runway and displaying the store's fashion collection.
  21. Cruise on the Seine - Find the best way to visit the "City of Light" enjoying a cruise on the Seine, especially at night. When the sun sets, the monuments are lit slowly. You get a panoramic view to the forefront so you can enjoy the beauty of the city.
  22. The Latin Quarter is located on the left bank of the Seine, around the Sorbonne. Known for its student life, lively atmosphere and bistros, the Latin Quarter is the home to many higher education institutions, such as the Ecole Normale Superieure, the Ecole des Mines de Paris or the Ecole Polytechnique.
  1. Rue Mouffetard - This cobblestoned market street is crammed with artisan bakers, fromageries and gourmet sweet shops. Visit it on a Saturday when it closes off to form a huge food market and listen out for the hum of bartering foodies and cat-calling vendors.
  2. Le Marais district-
  • Mariage Frères (30 Rue du Bourg Tibourg), is an exquisite tea salon serving aromatic teas with savory and sweet delicacies;
  • Falafel shop, L'As du Falafel (34 Rue des Rosiers), for enjoying the best take-away falafel pita.
  • Breizh Café, (Rue de Rivoli) for a buckwheat crêpe and a bowl of cider.
  1. Café de Flore (172 Boulevard Saint-Germain), is one of Paris’ oldest and most celebrated coffeehouses, with a long and famous history (the meeting place of Jean Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir)
  2. Vandermeersch, 278 Avenue Daumesnil, Pierre Hermé–trained pastry chef and baker Stéphane Vandermeersch's vintage boulangerie/pâtisserie.
  3. Clamato (80 Rue de Charonne) Michelin-starred chef Bertrand Grébaut and Théo Pourriat's no-reservations seafood house is a must try restaurant.
  4. Holybelly (19 Rue Lucien Sampaix) This new coffee shop next to the Canal Saint-Martin is a beloved local favorite notable for its Anglo breakfasts and specialty coffees from new local roaster Belleville Brûlerie.
  5. Boucherie des Provinces (20 Rue d'Aligre) Christophe Dru's eat-in butcher shop is known for his perfectly aged prime rib, steak tartare, chops (veal, pork, and lamb), charcuterie, and homemade meat terrines.
  6. Lockwood (73 Rue d'Aboukir) in Paris' garment district, Lockwood is an unassuming coffee shop by day and a hot rock-and-roll cocktail bar by night.
  7. Restaurant David Toutain (29 Rue Surcouf) Star chef David Toutain's new restaurant is the most buzzed about opening this year. Diners are crazy for Chef Toutain's sleek, cerebral cooking style, respect for quality ingredients, and daily changing menus.
  8. Le Perchoir (14 Rue Crespin du Gast) the chic new rooftop bar and restaurant Le Perchoir ("the bird's perch") has a stunning 360-degree city views, music, and cocktails.
  9. Frenchie to Go (9 Rue du Nil) Just a few doors down from his cult-favorite Frenchie bistro, chef Gregory Marchand's Anglo-style no-reservations deli may as well be called "Frenchie's Smokehouse".
  10. L'Avant Comptoir (9 Carrefour de l'Odéon) As wildly popular as celebrity chef Yves Camdeborde's Le Comptoir du Relais Saint-Germain bistro is, a little hors d'oeuvres bar next door, hidden behind an unassuming crêpe stand.
  11. La Pointe du Grouin (8 Rue de Belzunce) At chef/owner Thierry Breton's kitschy and charmingly chaotic new wine bar—a favorite late-night hangout of chefs and winemakers.

Metro

The metro is the ideal way to get around Paris fast and easily. There are 16 lines (including 2 "bis") traversing the city. At any given Metro station each Metro line will have 2 platforms, one for each direction.

Upon descending into a Metro station line platform, find a Metro map located on the platform wall. Find the current station you're at and then find the station you're traveling to. Once you find the destination station on the map, follow the Metro line to its end, the terminus, which will be the direction name you're after for this Metro line. By keeping the terminus stations in mind when switching Metro lines, you'll know which lines and in which directions you must travel to get to your destination.

Zones

The Ile de France region is divided into 5 concentric zones. The Paris metropolitan area fits into zones 1-5. CDG airport is in zone 5, Orly and Versailles in Zone 4. The city of Paris, within the Périphérique, is Zone 1. A RER Ile-de-France zone map can be found online.

Buses

Buses are also a great option as they allow you to see and enjoy the city while moving around. There are so many buses in Paris, you can go almost everywhere by bus. The only issue is to find where they stop! Bus stops are trickier to find than metro stations. Tickets are the same as the ones you use in the metro. A "t+" ticket allows transfers among buses for up to 90 minutes from the first trip. However, if you buy a ticket on board the bus, there are no transfers. Also, there are no transfers between bus and metro.

Keep in mind that the Parisian metro stops between 12.30 and 1 am, and buses usually stop between 9 and 10 pm, with reduced service continuing with night buses and Noctilien buses. Always look for your night bus itinerary before using it.

RER

The RER is also a good way to get from one point to another very fast. The lines are fewer though, so are the stops. It’s mainly used to travel to nearby suburbs, but can be convenient to cross the city in minutes. Although the Eiffel Tower has a metro station at Bir-Hakeim on Line 6, the closest access is through a RER stop (Champ de Mars - Tour Eiffel). Tickets are the same as metro tickets, but you must be careful if you go outside of Zone 1 around the city, which requires a billet Ile-de-France rather than a normal Ticket t.

Commuter rail (Trains de banlieue in French)

If you need to go in suburbs that are located a bit further from Paris, or just not reachable in RER, you may need to use SNCF commuter trains. All of the 6 Paris train stations have trains for the suburbs. (Gare Saint Lazare: western and south-western suburbs; gare de l’Est: eastern suburbs, gare du Nord: northern suburbs, gare de Lyon: south-eastern suburbs, gare Montparnasse: south-western suburbs, gare d’Austerlitz: southern suburbs).

Some TER trains that serve the cities outside Île de France overlap with commuter trains (e.g. those to Vernon for Giverny, Fontainebleau, or Chartres).

Boat

A fun and original way to get about in Paris is the boat. The Batobus is a unique line with 8 stops along the Seine. Batobus stops at every relevant monument in the city (Eiffel Tower, Orsay Museum, Louvres, Notre Dame…).

Trains (Mainline - Grandes Lignes in French)

There are 6 train stations in Paris: gare Saint Lazare, gare du Nord, gare de l’Est, gare de Lyon, gare d’Austerlitz and gare Montparnasse. Each of them serve a different part of France, and some of them also serve other countries. There are RER or metro services to access all of them.

Gare Saint Lazare is located in the Grands Magasins area, near the Opera Garnier, in the 8th arrondissement. Its trains serve western and south-western suburbs of Paris and Normandy.

Gare du Nord is located in the North of Paris, in the 10th arrondissement. In addition to all the northern cities of France, it serves London (Eurostar), Brussels, Cologne and Amsterdam (Thalys), Berlin…

Gare de l’Est is right next door to gare du Nord, in the 10th arrondissement. Its trains mainly serve eastern suburbs of Paris, and cities in the east of France. But there also are some international connections for Luxembourg, Germany and Central Europe (Orient Express).

Gare de Lyon is located in the east of Paris, in the 12th arrondissement. It covers the south-eastern suburbs of Paris as well as Lyon, Burgundy, Franche-Comté, all the south-east of France (TGV Méditerranée), but also Switzerland and Italy.

Gare d’Austerlitz is located in the south-east of Paris, in the 13th arrondissement. It covers the center of France. You can also find old night trains for Portugal and Spain there.

Gare Montparnasse is located in the 15th arrondissement, in the south west of Paris. It mainly covers western and south-western suburbs of Paris, but also all the west and south-west of France by TGV.

To find your way to the station, check the RATP website (metro, bus, RER).

Velib/Cycling

The almost free bicycle system in Paris, called VELIB (a contraction of Velo = Bike, and Libre = Free), is an excellent way to get around Paris, particularly for short trips.

The terminals provides a selection of languages that makes it easy for non-French speakers to use Velib.

  1. Eiffel Tower, Champ de Mars, 5 Avenue Anatole France, 75007 Paris, France, Phone:+33 892 70 12 39
  2. Triumphal arch, Place Charles de Gaulle, 75008 Paris, France, tel. +33 1 55 37 73 77, Hours: Open 10AM–11PM
  3. Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris, 6 Parvis Notre-Dame - Pl. Jean-Paul II, 75004 Paris, France, tel. +33 1 42 34 56 10
  4. Louvre Palace, Address: 75001 Paris, France, +33 1 40 20 50 50, Hours: Open 10AM–6PM
  5. Sacré-Cœur, 35 Rue du Chevalier de la Barre, 75018 Paris, tel. +33 1 53 41 89 00
  6. Panthéon, Address: Place du Panthéon, 75005 Paris, Phone:+33 1 44 32 18 00, Hours: Open 10AM–6:30PM
  7. Palais Garnier, Address: 8 Rue Scribe, 75009 Paris, Phone:+33 1 71 25 24 23
  8. Les Invalides, Address: Place des Invalides, 75007 Paris, Hours: Open 10AM–5:30PM
  9. The Centre Pompidou, Address: Place Georges-Pompidou, 75004 Paris, Phone:+33 1 44 78 12 33, Hours: Open 11AM–10PM
  10. Luxembourg Palace, Address: Rue de Vaugirard, 75006 Paris, Phone:+33 1 42 34 20 00
  11. Père Lachaise Cemetery, Address: 16 Rue du Repos, 75020 Paris, Phone:+33 1 55 25 82 10, Hours: Open 8AM–6PM
  12. Grand Palais, Address: 3 Avenue du Général Eisenhower, 75008 Paris, Phone:+33 1 44 13 17 17
  13. Hotel de Ville, Place de l'Hôtel de Ville 75004 Paris Tel. +33(0)1 42 76 40 40
  14. Les Invalides, Address: Place des Invalides, 75007 Paris, Hours: Open 10AM–5:30PM
  15. Le Palais Royal, Address: 8 Rue de Montpensier, 75001 Paris, Phone:+33 1 47 03 92 16, Hours: Open 7AM–11PM
  16. Église Saint-Sulpice, Address: 2 Rue Palatine, 75006 Paris, Phone:+33 1 42 34 59 98
  17. Hôtel Matignon, Address: 57 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, Phone:+33 1 42 75 80 00
  18. Bercy Village, Address: 28 Rue François Truffaut, 75012 Paris, Phone:+33 825 16 60 75, Hours: Open 5AM–2AM
  19. City of Science and Industry, Address: 30 Avenue Corentin Cariou, 75019 Paris, Phone:+33 1 40 05 70 00
  20. Marché de Rungis – SEMMARIS, Address: 1 Rue de la Tour, 94152 Rungis, Phone:+33 1 41 80 80 75, Hours: Open 4AM–8PM
  21. Moulin Rouge, Address: 82 Boulevard de Clichy, 75018 Paris, Phone:+33 1 53 09 82 82
  22. L'Olympia Bruno Coquatrix, Address: 28 Boulevard des Capucines, 75009 Paris, Phone:+33 892 68 33 68
  23. Louvre Museum, Address: 75001 Paris, Phone: +33 1 40 20 50 50, Hours: Open today · 9AM–6PM
  24. Musée d'Orsay, Address: 1 Rue de la Légion d'Honneur, 75007 Paris, Phone:+33 1 40 49 48 14, Hours: Open 9:30AM–9:45PM
  25. Rodin Museum, Address: 79 Rue de Varenne, 75007 Paris, Phone:+33 1 44 18 61 10, Hours: Open 10AM–5:45PM
  26. Orangerie Museum, Address: Jardin Tuileries, 75001 Paris, Phone:+33 1 44 50 43 00, Hours: Open 9AM–6PM
  27. Marché aux Puces de Saint-Ouen, Address: 138/140 Rue des Rosiers, 93400 Saint-Ouen, Phone:+33 1 40 11 77 36
  28. Coulée verte René-Dumont, Address: 69 Rue de Lyon, 75012 Paris, Hours: Open 8AM–8:30PM
  29. Galeries Lafayette Haussmann, Department Store, address 40 Boulevard Haussmann, 75009 Paris, tel. +33 1 42 82 34 56, Opens at 9:00 AM
  30. Disneyland Paris, Address: 77777 Marne-la-Vallée, Phone:+33 825 30 05 00, Hours: Open 10AM–8PM
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